sirloinSirloin


 

  • Top Sirloin Butt Boneless

    Top Sirloin Butt Boneless

    NAMP #184

    Technical Description – Boneless top sirloin butt is prepared from the thick upper portion of the sirloin butt. The cap is trimmed to an average fat cover of 6 mm (1/4"). The lean side is trimmed of all fat in excess of 6 mm (1/4"). The heavy white membrane adjacent to the sacral vertebrae and all ragged edges are trimmed off. The top sirloin weighs between 4 – 7 kg (9.0 – 15.5 lb).

    Top sirloins are supplied individually vacuum sealed and usually packed 5 per case.

    The NAMP #184 Top Sirloin is sold with the sirloin cap muscle, or “coulotte,” muscle attached. This specification may not be a good option for an operator with no butchery experience, as they may not be aware that the grain on the cap muscle runs in another direction. Tough steaks will result if this muscle is cut incorrectly.

    The top sirloin is a cost-effective option for the Retail Meat Case. The sirloin is the least expensive of the middle cuts and can be utilized in many traditional and non-traditional merchandising opportunities.

    Let us explore these opportunities as well as look at different specifications for ordering the top sirloin section.

    Other trim specifications options:

    Top Sirloin, Semi-Centre Cut, Boneless - NAMP #184A

    • Top sirloin cap muscle (coulotte) has been removed in this specification

    Top Sirloin, Centre-Cut, Cap Off, Boneless - NAMP #184B
    184B Top Sirloin Cap Off

    • This is a completely denuded top sirloin butt with all fat as well as the cap removed. This is a great option for a meat operation that has less-skilled meat cutters, since it eliminates the risk of the cap being sliced with the grain when creating steaks or roast offerings.
    • As previously stated, the price point of this beef cut, as with other beef cuts, increases with the amount of trimming that needs to be done at the fabrication plant.

    Cooking Methods
    Grilling
    Sauté/Pan Fry
    Oven Roasting
    Rotisserie

    Applications
    Steaks
    Roasts
    Strips for Stir Fry



     

  • Top Sirloin Steak

    Top Sirloin Steak

    NAMP #1184B

    Technical Description – Top sirloin steak is prepared from a top sirloin butt, boneless with fat cover averaging 6 mm (1/4"). Excess membrane on the underside is removed. A facing (a cut made to even off the “face” of a steak cut prior to portioning) is made to exclude excessive connective tissue on the round end. Available as regular or centre cut.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling

    Applications
    Steaks



  • Top Sirloin Medallion

    Top Sirloin Medallion

    NAMP #1184F

    Top sirloin medallions are commonly referred to as “Baseball Cut.”

    The top sirloin medallion is smaller in circumference but cut thicker to help reach preferred cooking doneness levels and customer price point. Medallions are achieved by splitting the sirloin into three equal sections cut across the grain and then tying into 25 – 50 mm (1 – 2") steaks across the grain. Some retail meat operations tie or net these medallions to add visual appeal to the steak and create uniformity in cooking. Medallions will perform better on the grill with less chance of overcooking by the retail meat customer. These steaks have an excellent price point even when upcharged from a regular sirloin steak.

    Another option with the top sirloin is to leave the roasts intact and sell them as rotisserie-style roasts - which meets the needs of today's consumers from both a price point and ease-of-carving perspective. The strings or the netting, as well as the shape, will help the customer to make the right decision on how to carve this roast. Creating roasts that are similar in shape (cylindrical) will create a finished product that is cooked evenly throughout.

    Misshaped open-face roasts are not as attractive, are harder to carve, and will not cook as evenly due to the uneven shape. Usually these roasts are much more expensive since they are heavier in weight. Also, the resulting higher price point can result in lost sales.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling

    Applications
    Steaks



     

  • Top Sirloin Cap (Coulotte)

    Top Sirloin Cap (Coulotte)

    NAMP #184D

    Technical Description – The top sirloin cap consists of the biceps femoris muscle (cap muscle). Purchasers may specify the exterior fat trim desired. The top sirloin cap muscle weighs between 0.7 – 1.2 kg (1.5 – 3.3 lb).

    Top sirloin caps are supplied individually vacuum sealed, packed 10 – 15 caps per case.

    The price point on the top sirloin cap is much better than most middle cuts, which makes the top sirloin cap an excellent option for retail meat operations. It is easy to process and it is critical that the meat cutter portions the cap across the grain. Many retailers are not using the top sirloin cap as it is unfamiliar, but it should be noted that this is a very tender muscle and makes a visually appealing steak (similar to a strip loin but smaller).

    The cap is also the perfect shape and tenderness for creating kebabs, which is a great opportunity for the retailer to have tender, visually appealing kebabs in their self-serve meat case or service meat case.

    The cap (also known as the coulotte) has the potential to be sold whole, and also sold with a rub on it, for a visually appealing premium oven roast.

    Top sirloin cap offers many varied menu application opportunities such as top sirloin roast, sandwich steaks, salad topper, kebabs, fondue or stir-fry dishes. Top sirloin cap is also used extensively for ethnic menu options like Brazilian BBQ.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling
    Sauté/Pan Fry

    Applications
    Steaks
    Roasts
    Strips for Stir Fry



  • Top Sirloin Cap Steak

    Top Sirloin Cap Steak

    NAMP #1184D

    Technical Description – Top sirloin cap steak is prepared from a top sirloin cap item. The boneless top sirloin cap steak is produced by slicing at an approximate right angle to the grain or in the direction of the muscle fibres.

    Top sirloin cap steaks look and perform very similarly to strip loin steaks, but are not as large. Top sirloin cap steaks are ideal for steak sandwiches or breakfast steaks.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling
    Sauté/Pan Fry

    Applications
    Steaks
    Strips for Stir Fry



     

  • Bottom Sirloin Flap Meat

    Bottom Sirloin Flap Meat

    NAMP #185A

    Technical Description – Bottom sirloin flap meat consists of the obliquus externus abdominis, but may contain the obliquus internus abdominis and tranversus abdominis. The boneless flap is separated from the ball tip and the tri-tip through the natural seam. The heavy connective tissue and any cartilage are excluded.

    Bottom sirloin flap meat, usually referred to as just flap meat is supplied in vacuum sealed bags weighing approximately 9 kg (20 lb), packed 2 – 3 bags per case.

    Bottom sirloin flap meat is a coarse-grain muscle that contains a high degree of marbling. Bottom sirloin flap meat is another hidden gem of the beef carcass. The grain is consistent on the bottom sirloin flap so it is easy to process.

    The bottom sirloin flap meat may be marinated or roasted whole.

    Bottom sirloin flap meat and inside and outside skirt meat options are very similar in texture and grain, but bottom sirloin flap meat is larger and may be used as a steak option.

    Bottom sirloin flap meat is unfamiliar to most Canadian retail meat operations. This cut is harvested from the flank area and is an extension of the sirloin, which extends into the flank.

    To properly merchandise this section, it is important for retail meat operation personnel to learn how to talk to their customers about this cut. The bottom sirloin flap is commonly used in Hispanic cooking and it requires marinating for best results. After marinating, it is grilled and cut on a bias (45° angle) across the grain.

    Meat operators who want to introduce this cut into their product mix would probably be well served to have this marinated and sold in the service meat case. This would allow the meat personnel the opportunity to explain to the customer how to cook this cut. With a little bit of practice, the bottom sirloin flap is easy to trim and portion into affordable steaks for the retail customer.

    One of the best options for this cut is to make satays, which are marinated and put onto skewers. Another option is to cut long butterfly strips 6 mm (1/4") thick, which can be marinated and sold as Arrachera for Latin cuisine.

    It is interesting that this cut was mostly used for grinds until packers found a market for it in Hispanic countries. Because of the popularity of this cut as an export item, it has become rather expensive and sometimes hard to source.

    The bottom sirloin flap is a beef cut for the retail meat operators who want to differentiate themselves from their competition.

    Bottom sirloin flap meat may be trimmed, marinated and then roasted whole and cut thinly across the grain for the traditional Quebec Bavette (Steak Frites) or fajita meat, sliced for salads or used as a bottom sirloin steak option.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling
    Sauté/Pan Fry
    Roasting

    Applications
    Steaks
    Strips for Stir Fry
    Sandwich Steaks
    Seasoned Skewers
    Seasoned Strips



  • Bottom Sirloin Tri-Tip

    Bottom Sirloin Tri-Tip

    NAMP #185C

    Technical Description – The Bottom sirloin tri-tip consists of the triangular-shaped muscle in the ventral end of the bottom sirloin butt. Average fat cover does not exceed 6 mm (1/4"). The bottom sirloin tri-tip weighs 1.4 – 2.4 kg (3 – 6 lb).

    Bottom sirloin tri-tips are supplied individually vacuum sealed and are usually packed 10 – 15 per case.

    The bottom sirloin tri-tip is a tender and flavourful beef cut with an economical price point. The sirloin tri-tip is popular in Southern California and sold as a Santa Maria tri-tip. The Santa Maria tri-tip is sold whole with a simple rub of salt, pepper and fresh rosemary. The tri-tip is slow roasted and often smoked and then sliced thinly across the grain.

    It is important to point out the grain direction to the customer who purchases this product because the grain changes in the muscle. If processing into bottom sirloin tri-tip steaks, make sure that you process the steaks across the grain for best results.

    Because of the shape and tenderness of the tri-tip muscle it is an exceptional option for producing inexpensive tender kebabs for the meat case, especially in the summer months.

    If introducing a whole tri-tip with a rub, make sure you order tri-tips (NAMP #185C) with a fat cover as the fat enhances the final cooked product and the palatability of the finished dish. Ideally the rubbed tri-tip roast should be introduced via the service meat case so the meat personnel in the store can explain the cooking technique to obtain best results with this cut.

    Remember that many customers are looking for new cuts and beef has many interesting sections that are often overlooked. Sections such as the bottom sirloin tri-tip provide a point of differentiation for the consumer who is seeking a unique eating experience.

    Bottom sirloin tri-tip is excellent for creating tender, tasty, evenly-shaped satays, which can be marinated and sold on a skewer.

    Bottom sirloin tri-tip can be made into a quick roast or cut into grilling medallions.

    Bottom sirloin tri-tip performs best when spice rubbed and roasted whole.

    Bottom sirloin tri-tip is often used in traditional American BBQ where it is smoked and slow cooked for a long period of time.

    A bottom sirloin tri-tip roast must be carved across the grain for best results.


    Cooking Methods
    Sauté/Pan Fry
    Roasting

    Applications
    Steaks
    Roasts
    Strips for Skewers and Satays



  • Bottom Sirloin Tri Tip Steak

    Bottom Sirloin Tri Tip Steak

    NAMP #1185C

    Technical Description - Bottom sirloin tri-tip steaks are prepared from the triangle-shaped muscle of the bottom sirloin butt. The boneless bottom sirloin tri-tip steak is produced by slicing at approximately a right angle to the grain or direction of the muscle fibres.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling
    Sauté/Pan Fry

    Applications
    Steaks



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