ribRib


 

  • Rib, Primal

    Rib, Primal

    NAMP #103

    The primal rib originates from the upper back region of the front quarter and represents approximately 5% of a chilled bone-in carcass by weight. The primal rib is separated into two sub-primal cuts including the main rib and the short ribs. Marketable components include: rib, boneless rib, rib eye, back ribs and short ribs. The primal rib weighs between 6.0 – 7.5 kg (13.0 – 16.5 lb).

    Many cuts from the primal rib are available in a variety of bone-in and boneless styles and trim specifications.

    Note that rib eye roasts and steaks may be produced from the primal rib, as the rib eye is just the main muscle remaining after the tail and bones have been removed. Such removal is relatively easy to do, but does require some butchery skill.


    Cooking Methods
    Roasting

    Applications
    Roasts


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Rib, Roast-ready

    Rib, Roast-ready

    NAMP #109

    Technical Description – Rib roast-ready is prepared from the primal rib. All bones and cartilage are removed, except the 6th to 12th rib bones. The short rib is cut off in a straight line at the outer edge of the rib eye muscle at both the loin and chuck ends, leaving a predetermined tail length. The back strap is removed and the fat cap is lifted and trimmed to an average of 20% of finished roast weight. The fat cap is replaced, covering the Rib eye’s entire outer surface. It is held in place, string tied or netted. Also known as chef style, deluxe, banquet style, roast ready rib is available as bone-in or boneless.

    The tail is the amount of beef product measured from the edge of the rib eye to the end of the tail. Tail length is measured in the following manner: Rib (3x4) has a tail measuring 3” at the loin end and 4” at the chuck end. Tail lengths available for roast ready rib include: 2x2; 2x3; 1x2; 0x1.

    Roast-ready rib is not the most popular specification to order in retail markets and is more popular in foodservice. It should be noted that if an opportunity for an attractive price comes from the packer, you might want to order this product as all of the cuts that are described from the rib section can be manufactured from this specification.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling
    Sauté/Pan Fry
    Oven Roasting
    Braising,Simmering, Stewing or Pot Roasting

    Applications
    Roasts


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Rib - FCO (Fat Cap Off)

    Rib - FCO (Fat Cap Off)

    NAMP #109D

    Technical Description – Rib FCO (Fat Cap Off) is prepared identically to the rib roast ready, except that the fat cap is excluded and the remaining fat cover is trimmed not to exceed 6 mm (1/4") over the lean muscle with beveled edge at the tail. Rib FCO is available as bone-in or boneless with tail lengths of 2x3, 2x2, 1x2 and 0x1. In addition, the short plate shall be further excluded by a straight cut that is ventral to, but no more than 5 cm (2") from, the longissimus dorsi at the loin end to a point on the chuck end ventral to, but no more than 7.5 cm (3") from, the longissimus dorsi. Tail not to exceed 2x3.

    Rib FCO is also known as “export rib.”

    Rib FCO is the most common specification option for bone-in prime rib cuts used in retail meat operations. All of the boneless and bone-in cuts that are sold in retail operations can be achieved from this section. Please go through the technical sheets for the rib and view the video to show some of the cuts that can be achieved from this section of the beef carcass.

    You will see the versatility of this cut and you will also see some new generation cut options that might fit into your operations, such as the stuffed spinalis as well as the medallion cuts and rotisserie-style roast.

    If you do sell the spinalis at retail as a stuffed product, it would be wise to put a modifier on the name to help with the merchandising appeal, such as Rocky Mountain Rib Eye Roll (Rib Eye Spinalis). This is a great example of a product for the service meat case that would create a point of differentiation from your competitors and would demand a higher price due to the labor involved in its manufacturing.

    Remember that if you are manufacturing boneless products from the rib FCO, it will be important to merchandise the back ribs. By putting a simple rub on the back ribs you will be creating a visually appealing, value-added product that should sell well during grilling season or as a braised product in the wintertime.

    Many customers consider the rib section to be the most desirable section of the beef animal due to the increased flavour from this well marbled cut. Boneless and bone-in prime rib roasts and steaks, as well as rib eye options, will always be popular with customers.

    Holiday times such as Christmas and Easter will see a spike in sales and demand on the rib section. Larger roasts are often sold during these times, used as a celebratory meal around family gatherings. Make sure you meet these demands by having enough stock on hand, aging the product properly before processing and keeping historical records of these sales so that you can forward-buy for the next holiday season.


    Cooking Methods
    Roasting

    Applications
    Steaks


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Oven-ready Boneless Rib

    Oven-ready Boneless Rib

    NAMP #110

    Technical Description – Oven-ready boneless rib has the beef back rib bones and finger meat removed. The exterior fat cover shall not extend beyond the short plate edge. Boneless, netted or tied, and tail lengths generally do not exceed 2x2.

    Oven-ready boneless rib may also be commonly called “tuxedo ribs” or boneless fat cap on rib.

    The option for the oven-ready boneless rib is not often used in retail operations but both the rib eye roll and oven-ready boneless rib are suitable for sourcing boneless rib cuts.

    The prudent meat retailer should ask about pricing for both the oven-ready boneless rib and rib eye roll and do yield and profit tests to see which option works out to be most cost effective for their operations. Remember that with oven-ready boneless ribs, the tail is left on and this will generate a little bit more trim than the rib eye roll specification.


    Cooking Methods
    Roasting

    Applications
    Roasts


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Rib Eye Roll

    Rib Eye Roll

    NAMP #112

    Technical Description – Rib eye roll is prepared from a capless rib with the rib bones removed by scalping, and tail nearly (1x1) or completely (0x0) trimmed off.

    Rib eye roll consists of only the rib eye muscle and is the most expensive option from the rib.

    The 0x0 rib eye roll has no tail.

    All these options require little butchery skill and can be easily made into steaks, or conveniently roasted.

    The more common boneless cut used in retail meat operations is the rib eye roll. The prudent meat retailer should ask about pricing for both the rib eye roll and the oven-ready boneless rib and do yield and profit tests to see which option works out to be most cost effective for their operations. All boneless rib cuts can be obtained from this section with the least amount of work because there is no tail on this section.


    Cooking Methods
    Roasting

    Applications
    Steaks
    Roasts


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Lip-on Ribeye

    Lip-on Ribeye

    NAMP #112A

    Technical Description – The lip-on ribeye contains the longissimus dorsi, spinalis dorsi, complexus, and multifidus dorsi muscles and a “lip” consisting of the serratus dorsi and longissimus costarum muscles and related intermuscular fat on the short plate side. The lip length is prepared with a straight cut that is ventral, but no more than 5 cm (2") from, the longissimus dorsi. Lip shall not exceed 5 cm x 5 cm (2” x 2”).

    The lip-on ribeye, after confirming through yield testing, might be an option for the retailer if the pricing from the packer is better than the rib eye roll specification.


    Cooking Methods
    Roasting

    Applications
    Steaks
    Roasts


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Beef Back Ribs

    Beef Back Ribs

    NAMP #124

    Technical Description – Beef back ribs are the intact portion of the seven ribs (i.e., 6th through 12th ribs) and intercostal meat from a rib. The chine bone and thoracic vertebrae are removed exposing the sawed end of the rib bones. Unless otherwise specified, beef back ribs shall be no less than 15 cm (6") or more than 20 cm (8") wide at any point measured across the sawed ends of the rib bones.

    Beef back ribs as a centre-of-plate item has emerged from many chefs and consumers using boneless rib products.

    Beef back ribs are an excellent product to slow roast with a rub. Many chefs will remove the membrane on the outside of the ribs, apply a dry rub and then parboil or simmer the ribs. The beef back ribs are then finished in the oven or on the grill to achieve a nice colour.

    Beef ribs or beef back ribs should be considered as part of the product mix for retailers, especially in the summer time. By slicing the back ribs 6 mm (1/4") thick on the band saw and putting a simple rub on them, you can create a very simple, value-added beef product for your meat counter.

    Meaty back ribs can be obtained if you bone-out your own back ribs from bone-in prime ribs and leave the tail meat on the back ribs. This product is visually more appealing than a packer back rib, and retains the tail meat on the more expensive back rib rather than using it as trim in less expensive grinds.

    Back ribs can create a point of differentiation from competitors who do not carry this product.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling
    Braising/Simmering

    Applications
    BBQ Ribs


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Rib Steak (Bone-in)

    Rib Steak (Bone-in)

    NAMP #1103

    Technical Description – Bone-in rib steak is prepared from a capless rib, the latissimus dorsi, infraspinatus and trapezius muscles above the blade bone and the subscapularis and rhomboideus muscles below it with not more than 6 mm (1/4”) of external fat. Tail length does not exceed 50 mm (2”) measured from the extreme outer tip of the rib eye muscle. The bone-in rib steak should be free of bone dust.

    Bone-in rib steaks are an option that will work for some retail meat operations. Remember that all of the bone dust should be removed from both sides of the steak as bone dust occurs on bone-in products that are manufactured with the meat saw.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling

    Applications
    Steaks


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Rib Steak, Frenched (Bone-in)

    Rib Steak, Frenched (Bone-in)

    NAMP #1103B

    Technical Description – The Frenched bone-in rib steak is the same as NAMP #1103 Bone-in Rib Steak, but each steak is cut between the rib bones. The rib bone is completely trimmed of the intercostal meat, lean and fat, so that the bone is exposed from the ventral edge of the longissimus dorsi to the end of the rib bone.

    The Frenched bone-in rib steak is commonly referred to as “Tomahawk” or “Cowboy Steak” and has become increasingly popular because these steaks can create excitement, with weights of up to 0.9 kg (2 lb).

    Traditional bone-in "Tomahawk" steaks are difficult to manufacture as most large meat plants will not sell ribs with the extra short rib needed to make a dramatically long bone "tomahawk." Generally, a retailer would have to source from a smaller harvest facility to find this specification.

    Smaller Frenched bone-in steaks can be manufactured from the regular bone-in prime ribs by cutting between the bone with your knife and then removing the meat from the bone at the tail end. These bone-in prime rib steaks could be sold as Prime Rib Mini Tomahawk Steaks, and will create a point of differentiation in your meat case.

    Some distributors are starting to manufacture prime rib tomahawk steaks for their clients but this is more common in foodservice.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling

    Applications
    Steaks


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Rib Steak (Boneless)

    Rib Steak (Boneless)

    NAMP #1112A

    The boneless rib steak is prepared exactly as bone-in rib steak except that all other bones, cartilages and the intercostal meat are removed.

    Boneless rib steaks are not a common retail product as a retailer can process a more acceptable rib eye steak by removing the tail meat. Rib eyes are more familiar to most retail customers and command a higher price point at retail.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling

    Applications
    Steaks


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Rib Eye Steak

    Rib Eye Steak

    NAMP #1112

    Technical Description – Rib eye steak is prepared from a rib eye with not more than 6 mm (1/4") external fat; rib eye steaks will have no evidence of tail meat in the retail market (as dictated by the CFIA).

    Rib eye steaks are a classic steak sold in most retail meat operations. Rib eyes are usually well marbled and deliver intense rich beef flavour. Rib eyes have been part of most retail operations' product mix for many decades, and they command a very high retail price because of the flavour and tenderness of this section of the beef animal.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling

    Applications
    Steaks


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Rib Eye Cap Steak and Roast

    Rib Eye Cap Steak and Roast

    NAMP #1112D

    Technical Description - Boneless rib eye cap steak or roast is prepared from the spinalis dorsi/multifidus dorsi muscle from any rib eye roll items. For portioning, slice the rib eye cap at a right angle to the grain or direction of the muscle fibres. Please watch the video on the Prime Rib to understand how to manufacture the spinalis into roasts and steaks from the prime rib.

    Boneless rib eye cap steak is commonly known as spinalis steak and is being sold by large meat retailers in the United States. The spinalis has also gained popularity among some progressive foodservice companies. As noted earlier this product should be introduced via the service meat case, as it may warrant explanation as to where it comes from and how to cook it. Due to the additional labour required and its value impact on the traditional primal rib, boneless rib eye cap steak requires a higher retail price point to drive profitability.



  • Rib Eye Medallion

    Rib Eye Medallion

    NAMP #112C - Component

    The rib eye medallion can be processed from any of the whole muscle specifications that we have discussed in this section, but heavier ribs work best for this application: 6.7 kg (15 lb) and up. The first step is to remove the spinalis dorsi, or cap muscle, and any finger meat from the rib. This exposes the fat kernel, which should also be removed. The tail on the rib should be removed leaving the main muscle (longissimus), which is tapered in shape. The main muscle is cut where the muscle tapers, leaving two pieces. The larger piece is split lengthwise, resulting in three equal-sized pieces that can then be portioned into thick-cut medallions. Effective use of this beef cut relies on the ability to add value to the cap muscle that was removed during the production of the medallions. The cap muscle (spinalis dorsi) can be utilized by rolling (stuffing optional) and netting, maximizing the yield and creating new menu opportunities.

    The rib eye medallion merchandising concept creates a steak option which is smaller than a traditional rib eye. Steaks that are smaller can create a thicker, more affordable option for the customer. The medallion steak is very attractive and commands a higher price point. Left as a roast, it creates a quick-roast option which can be cut to about 0.5 kg (1 lb), which meets the needs of many retail customers: Easy to cook, easy to carve and the right size for two or three people.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling

    Applications
    Steaks


    pdfRib Tech Sheet


Hip
Sirloin
Loin
Rib
Chuck
Flank
Plate
Brisket