ribRib


 

  • Rib, Primal

    Rib, Primal

    NAMP #103

    The primal rib originates from the upper back region of the front quarter and represents approximately 12% of a chilled bone-in carcass by weight. The primal rib is separated into two sub-primal cuts including the main rib and the short ribs. Marketable components include: rib, boneless rib, rib eye, back ribs and short ribs. The primal rib weighs between 6.0 – 7.5 kg (13.0 – 16.5 lb).

    Many cuts from the primal rib are available in a variety of bone-in and boneless styles and trim specifications.

    Note that rib eye roasts and steaks may be produced from the primal rib, as the rib eye is just the main muscle remaining after the tail and bones have been removed. Such removal is relatively easy to do, but does require some butchery skill.


    Cooking Methods
    Roasting

    Applications
    Roasts


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Rib, Roast-ready

    Rib, Roast-ready

    NAMP #109

    Technical Description – Rib roast-ready is prepared from the primal rib. All bones and cartilage are removed, except the 6th to 12th rib bones. The short rib is cut off in a straight line at the outer edge of the rib eye muscle at both the loin and chuck ends, leaving a predetermined tail length. The back strap is removed and the fat cap is lifted and trimmed to an average of 20% of finished roast weight. The fat cap is replaced, covering the Rib eye’s entire outer surface. It is held in place, string tied or netted. Also known as chef style, deluxe, banquet style, roast ready rib is available as bone-in or boneless.

    The tail is the amount of beef product measured from the edge of the rib eye to the end of the tail. Tail length is measured in the following manner: Rib (3x4) has a tail measuring 3” at the loin end and 4” at the chuck end. Tail lengths available for roast ready rib include: 2x2; 2x3; 1x2; 0x1.

    Roast ready rib is the most popular bone-in rib item in foodservice.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling
    Sauté/Pan Fry
    Oven Roasting
    Braising,Simmering, Stewing or Pot Roasting

    Applications
    Roasts


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


     

  • Rib - FCO (Fat Cap Off)

    Rib - FCO (Fat Cap Off)

    NAMP #109D

    Technical Description – Rib FCO (Fat Cap Off) is prepared identically to the rib roast ready, except that the fat cap is excluded and the remaining fat cover is trimmed not to exceed 6 mm (1/4") over the lean muscle with beveled edge at the tail. Rib FCO is available as bone-in or boneless with tail lengths of 2x3, 2x2, 1x2 and 0x1. In addition, the short plate shall be further excluded by a straight cut that is ventral to, but no more than 5 cm (2") from, the longissimus dorsi at the loin end to a point on the chuck end ventral to, but no more than 7.5 cm (3.0") from, the longissimus dorsi. Tail not to exceed 2x3.

    Rib FCO is also known as “export rib.”


    Cooking Methods
    Roasting

    Applications
    Steaks


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Oven-ready Boneless Rib

    Oven-ready Boneless Rib

    NAMP #110

    Technical Description – Oven-ready boneless rib has the beef back rib bones and finger meat removed. The exterior fat cover shall not extend beyond the short plate edge. Boneless, netted or tied, and tail lengths generally do not exceed 2x2.

    Oven-ready boneless rib may also be commonly called “tuxedo ribs” or boneless fat cap on rib.


    Cooking Methods
    Roasting

    Applications
    Roasts


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Rib Eye Roll

    Rib Eye Roll

    NAMP #112

    Technical Description – Rib eye roll is prepared from a capless rib with the rib bones removed by scalping, and tail nearly (1x1) or completely (0x0) trimmed off.

    Rib eye roll consists of only the rib eye muscle and is the most expensive option from the rib.

    The 0x0 rib eye roll has no tail.

    All these options require little butchery skill and can be easily made into steaks, or conveniently roasted.


    Cooking Methods
    Roasting

    Applications
    Steaks
    Roasts


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Lip-on Ribeye

    Lip-on Ribeye

    NAMP #112A

    Technical Description – The lip-on ribeye contains the longissimus dorsi, spinalis dorsi, complexus, and multifidus dorsi muscles and a “lip” consisting of the serratus dorsi and longissimus costarum muscles and related intermuscular fat on the short plate side. The lip length is prepared with a straight cut that is ventral, but no more than 5 cm (2") from, the longissimus dorsi. Lip shall not exceed 5 cm x 5 cm (2” x 2”).

    This lip-on ribeye has become a very popular rib option in foodservice.


    Cooking Methods
    Roasting

    Applications
    Steaks
    Roasts


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Beef Back Ribs

    Beef Back Ribs

    NAMP #124

    Technical Description – Beef back ribs are the intact portion of the seven ribs (i.e., 6th through 12th ribs) and intercostal meat from a rib. The chine bone and thoracic vertebrae are removed exposing the sawed end of the rib bones. Unless otherwise specified, beef back ribs shall be no less than 15 cm (6") or more than 20 cm (8") wide at any point measured across the sawed ends of the rib bones.

    Beef back ribs as a center-of-plate item has emerged from many chefs and consumers using boneless rib products.

    Beef back ribs are an excellent product to slow roast with a rub. Many chefs will remove the membrane on the outside of the ribs, apply a dry rub and then parboil or simmer the ribs. The beef back ribs are then finished in the oven or on the grill to achieve a nice colour.

    Beef ribs or beef back ribs should be considered by foodservice operators as a possible appetizer dish.

    The price point on beef back ribs is very favourable and would be an excellent option for an operator wanting to differentiate their menu from those using pork back ribs on their menu.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling
    Braising/Simmering

    Applications
    BBQ Ribs


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Rib Steak (Bone-in)

    Rib Steak (Bone-in)

    NAMP #1103

    Technical Description – Bone-in rib steak is prepared from a capless rib, the latissimus dorsi, infraspinatus and trapezius muscles above the blade bone and the subscapularis and rhomboideus muscles below it with not more than 6 mm (1/4”) of external fat. Tail length does not exceed 50 mm (2”) measured from the extreme outer tip of the rib eye muscle. The bone-in rib steak should be free of bone dust.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling

    Applications
    Steaks


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Rib Steak, Frenched (Bone-in)

    Rib Steak, Frenched (Bone-in)

    NAMP #1103B

    Technical Description – The Frenched bone-in rib steak is the same as NAMP #1103 Bone-in Rib Steak, but each steak is cut between the rib bones. The rib bone is completely trimmed of the intercostal meat, lean and fat, so that the bone is exposed from the ventral edge of the longissimus dorsi to the end of the rib bone.

    The Frenched bone-in rib steak is commonly referred to as “Tomahawk” or “Cowboy Steak” and has become increasingly popular because these steaks can create excitement, with weights of up to 0.9 kg (2 lb).


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling

    Applications
    Steaks


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Rib Steak (Boneless)

    Rib Steak (Boneless)

    NAMP #1112A

    The boneless rib steak is prepared exactly as bone-in rib steak except that all other bones, cartilages and the intercostal meat are removed.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling

    Applications
    Steaks


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Rib Eye Steak

    Rib Eye Steak

    NAMP #1112

    Technical Description – Rib eye steak is prepared from a rib eye with not more than 6 mm (1/4") of external fat. Rib eye steaks are of a uniform thickness and available with 1" or 0" tail.

    Rib eye steak has the reputation for being the most marbled of all the steak classics and delivers intense rich beef flavour. Often described on menus as extremely juicy, highly marbled and flavourful, with a rich finish.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling

    Applications
    Steaks


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Rib Eye Cap Steak

    Rib Eye Cap Steak

    NAMP #1112D

    Technical Description - Boneless rib eye cap steak is prepared from the spinalis dorsi/multifidus dorsi muscle from any rib eye roll items. For portioning, slice the rib eye cap at a right angle to the grain or direction of the muscle fibres.

    Boneless rib eye cap steak is commonly known as spinalis steak and has become a relatively popular item in foodservice.


    Resources
    pdfRib Tech Sheet


  • Rib Eye Medallion

    Rib Eye Medallion

    NAMP #112C - Component

    Prepared from the boneless lip-on ribeye, the rib eye medallion is best-suited utilizing heavy ribs 6.7 kg (15 lb) and up. The first step is to remove the spinalis dorsi, or cap muscle, and any finger meat from the rib. This exposes the fat kernel, which should also be removed. The tail on the rib should be removed leaving the main muscle (longissimus), which is tapered in shape. The main muscle is cut where the muscle tapers, leaving two pieces. The larger piece is split lengthwise, resulting in three equal-sized pieces that can then be portioned into thick-cut medallions. Effective use of this beef cut relies on the ability to add value to the cap muscle that was removed during the production of the medallions. The cap muscle (spinalis dorsi) can be utilized by rolling (stuffing optional) and netting, maximizing the yield and creating new menu opportunities.

    This unique offering also creates a thicker steak option and is particularly good for use as a signature à la carte or banquet item. The thickness of the cut provides superior doneness control, which is particularly important for plated banquets where holding time can be a challenge.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling

    Applications
    Steaks


    pdfRib Tech Sheet


Hip
Sirloin
Loin
Rib
Chuck
Flank
Plate
Brisket