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  • Chuck Roll

    Chuck Roll

    NAMP #116A

    Technical Description – The chuck roll is prepared from a neck of boneless, square-cut chuck and consists only of the large muscle system that lies under the blade bone. The arm portion is excluded by a straight cut that is not more than 7.5 cm (3") at the rib end and not more than 10 cm (4") at the neck end. Any cartilages, back strap, trapeziusm supraspinatus, intercostals meat and lymph glands are also excluded. When smaller roasts are specified, the boneless chuck roll is divided into equal portions by cutting through the meat perpendicular to the length of the chuck roll. This item may be netted or tied when specified. The chuck roll weighs between 7 – 9 kg (15 – 20 lb).

    The chuck roll is sometimes called the bottom blade or boneless blade. Chuck roll is usually supplied vacuum sealed and packed 2 – 3 rolls per case.

    The chuck roll has an abundance of marbling throughout the muscle, and can be braised whole, processed into simmering steaks or cut into stew meat. Because of its marbling, the chuck roll makes an excellent source-grind beef product that can be used for making an exceptional beef sausage or chuck burger.

    There is about a 7.7 cm – 10 cm (3" – 4") section of the chuck roll that contains some rib eye muscle called the chuck eye muscle, where the chuck roll was separated from the rib section. The chuck eye is a tender section (2 – 3 steaks from the loin end) that can be dry-heat roasted or processed into “Delmonico” steaks.

    The chuck roll may be cut into boneless bottom blade roasts and steaks.

    Foodservice operators with large staffs [e.g., Cruise Lines] could utilize this cost-effective item for staff meals.


    Cooking Methods
    Pot Roasting
    Braising/Simmering

    Applications
    Roasts
    Clod Roast
    Blade Eye Roast
    Restructured Roasts and Products
    Cooked Pot Roast
    Seasoned Roasts



  • Top Blade (Chuck Tender)

    Top Blade (Chuck Tender)

    NAMP #116B

    Technical Description – Top blade (chuck tender) consists of the supraspinatus muscle, which lies dorsal to the medial ridge of the blade bone. The chuck tender is separated from the other muscles through the natural seam. The heavy connective tissue on the thick end of the chuck tender should be exposed and removed. The chuck tender weighs between 2 – 3 kg (4.5 – 6.5 lb).

    Chuck tenders are supplied individually vacuum sealed, and usually packed 5 – 10 tenders per case.

    The chuck tender is also known as a mock tender, as it is shaped like the tenderloin butt. Other names include Scotch tender or top blade.

    Chuck tender is an excellent item for braising or stewing.


    Cooking Methods
    Pot Roasting
    Braising/Simmering

    Applications
    Braised Roasts



  • Chuck Tail Flat

    Chuck Tail Flat

    NAMP #116G

    Technical Description – Chuck tail flat consists of the serratis ventralis muscle. The fat coverage should be minimal with all heavy connective tissue removed and no ragged edges. The bone-in version of the chuck tail flat is the chuck short rib.

    The chuck tail flat is also known as a “Denver Steak,” which can be marinated and grilled. Some chefs will use the chuck tail flat as a “boneless short rib” because of its excellent marbling.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling

    Applications
    Sandwich Steaks
    Strips for Stir Fry



  • Shoulder Clod

    Shoulder Clod

    NAMP #114E

    Technical Description – Shoulder clod is prepared from the large muscle, posterior to the elbow joint in the chuck. The overlying fat is trimmed to an average fat cover of 6 mm (1/4"). The inside is trimmed of all heavy tissue covering the lean, where it is attached to the shoulder blade. All ragged edges and loose meat is trimmed off. Shoulder clod weight range is 2.8 – 4.6 kg (6 – 10 lb).

    Another common name for this beef cut is short cut clod.

    A beef carcass holds a number of different muscles with various grain directions. Like all beef cuts, the shoulder clod muscle should be isolated to achieve best cooking results. Removing the flat iron, petite tender and the main muscle, cap-holding membrane from the shoulder clod yields 2 beef portions that may be steaked into what is known as “Ranch Steak” by simply removing the rope meat and cutting the shoulder clod across the grain. Making the most of shoulder clod requires ample butchery skills.

    The best cooking results for shoulder clod are obtained through braising or simmering.

    Shoulder clod has extremely good price-point value and is an excellent option for commercial foodservice operations such as healthcare.


    Cooking Methods
    Pot Roasting
    Braising/Simmering

    Applications
    Pot Roast
    Sandwich



  • Shoulder [Clod], Top Blade

    Shoulder [Clod], Top Blade

    NAMP 114D

    Technical Description – Shoulder clod, top blade is derived from NAMP #114 and consists of the infraspinalis muscle, untrimmed. Shoulder clod, top blade weights between 2.7 – 3.2 kg (6 – 7 lb).

    Shoulder clod, top blade is also known as flat iron, oyster blade or just top blade.

    Shoulder clod, top blade is usually supplied individually vacuum sealed and packed 5 – 10 clods per case.

    Shoulder clod, top blade is considered to be one of the hidden gems on the beef carcass, as it is one of the most tender muscles on the carcass. Removing the shoulder tendon that runs through the middle of this beef cut yields two approximately equal portions of flat iron. These two muscles may be cut into an excellent grilling steak and could be a signature dish on a client’s menu.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling
    Sauté/Pan Fry
    Oven Roasting
    Braising, Simmering, Stewing or Pot Roasting

    Applications
    Pot Roast
    Steaks
    Marinating Strips



     

  • Top Blade (Flat Iron Steaks)

    Top Blade (Flat Iron Steaks)

    NAMP #1114D

    Technical Description – Top blade, or flat iron steak, is prepared from the shoulder clod consisting of the infraspinatus muscle. For the best eating experience, remove the heavy connective tissue running through the length of the muscle by seaming from end to end.

    Top blade, or flat iron steak, is nearly identical to NAMP #114D Shoulder (clod), top blade but is sold pre-portioned.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling

    Applications
    Steaks



  • Clod Tender

    Clod Tender

    NAMP #114F

    Technical Description - The teres major muscle is produced when making the clod tender. The small, cone-shaped muscle lies just beneath the triceps brachii, as well as under and to the posterior edge of the scapula/blade bone. The muscle fibres run parallel to the long axis of this muscle, which may have some connective tissue on its external side. Clod tender is trimmed to the silver, with flake fat allowed. The clod tender weighs between 400 g – 700 g (0.8 – 1.5 lb).

    Clod tender is usually supplied vacuum sealed approximately 10 clod tenders per bag, packed 3 bags per case.

    Clod tender is also known as petit tender, shoulder tender or teres major.

    Clod tender is another hidden gem on the chuck area of the beef carcass. It is a small very tender muscle with consistent grain found on the top side of the shoulder clod.

    Only a small amount of trimming of silver skin is required to make the clod tender grill or roast ready.

    The clod tender is an excellent muscle for small grilling medallions or it can be grilled or roasted whole.

    The clod tender will toughen or dry out easily when overcooked because it does not have a lot of internal marbling. Cooked to rare or medium rare, this muscle will perform well on any menu.

    A creative chef may use the clod tender in a mini-Beef Wellington application.


    Cooking Methods
    Grilling
    Sauté/Pan Fry
    Oven Roasting
    Braising, Simmering, Stewing or Pot Roasting
    Rotisserie

    Applications
    Steaks
    Roasts



     

  • Diced Beef

    Diced Beef

    NAMP #135A

    Technical Description – Diced beef is prepared from any part of the carcass trimmed free of bones, cartilage, fibrous and membranous tissue, exposed major blood vessels, glands and blood clots. Meat from heads, gullets, tongues, and glands is not used. All external and exposed internal fat is trimmed to achieve a chemical lean of 85%. The meat is machined or hand-diced to produce reasonably uniform pieces.


    Cooking Methods
    Stewing

    Applications
    Stews
    Casseroles
    Kabobs
    Meat Pies


  • Beef Marinating Strips

    Beef Marinating Strips

    NAMP #612

    Technical Description – Beef marinating trips may be produced from any raw skeletal portion of the beef carcass with the exception of the cutaneous, shank, and heel meat portions. The meat shall be practically free of fat and shall be marinated or seasoned as requested.

    Common names include beef marinating stir-fry strips or fajita strips.


    Cooking Methods
    Sauté/Pan Fry
    Stewing

    Applications
    Stir Fry
    Fajita
    Salads
    Pizza Topping
    Appetizers
    Wraps


Hip
Sirloin
Loin
Rib
Chuck
Flank
Plate
Brisket